How To Clean A Pond

How to clean a pond

If you are searching for “how to clean a pond“, this post by The Backyard Pond can help! It doesn’t matter how hard you try, you will have to clean your pond at some point. Cleaning your pond can greatly increase the lifetime of your pond (and your Koi fish, if you have them) and let you enjoy it for years to come.

Cleaning Your Pond

There will come a time that you will need to clean your pond. You may be preparing your pond for the summer or winter, or maybe you been a little lax on the upkeep and maintenance. There are steps you can take to clean your pond and make it look “newish”.  A clean pond gives a new environment for the bacteria in your biological filter and fresh water for the fish. The amount of cleaning required will usually depend on the size of your pond and location of it.

Remove Your Koi Fish From Your Pond

This is far from a clean job, so you shouldn’t wear your Sunday best. Take into account you’re going get dirty, the smell may be unbearable and it might be a bit cold. You’re going to need a fine mesh aquarium net, a garden hose with a spray adapter, and a holding tank (if you plan on removing your fish) big enough to store your fish while cleaning out your pond. You also may need to use a pond vacuum, pond cleaning gloves, if you have access to them.

If your pond is a smaller one, you can simply scoop your Koi out with the aquarium net to transfer them into the holding tank. If you have a larger Koi pond, it might be simpler to just let the fish be. If you do plan on removing them, fill the holding tank with pond water from you pond so an abrupt change in water temperature or water quality won’t shock your fish.

 Get Rid Of Surface Debris

More often than not you’re going to see an assortment of sticks and leaves floating on the surface of the pond. Use the net to scoop out all of the debris. This is an easy part but don’t think this is it, you’re far from done. You’re going to get messy soon enough.

Drain The Koi Pond

Use a pond pump to drain the water out of the pond. If you leave your fish in the pond, you clearly don’t want to pump out all of the pond water.

Draining will expose the sides of the pond and makes it a lot easier to remove the algae and other gunk. Depending on the type and strength of your pond pump and the size of your pond, it could take a couple of minutes or in some cases longer than an hour.

Make sure to send the pond water to an area in your yard that has really good drainage. Also try and take at least an hour-long break after you drain the pond and let the sun to dry out the newly revealed algae.

Remove Any Pond Plants and Any Accessories

Remove the pond pump, pond plants and anything else that can be removed. Remove any water lilies and other pond plants in autumn, if you still have plants in your pond at the beginning of spring, take them out too. Use the garden hose and an old toothbrush to really clean all the accessories and their hard to reach places. This is an ideal time to clean or replace the filter on your pond pump. Some pumps have a mesh bag, I yours does simply spray it off with your hose.

Clean the Pump

Now is a great time to clean out your pond’s pump. There are various different types of algae that can thrive in your ponds’ ecosystem. While some of it is valuable for the pond and a natural part of its ecosystem, while string algae is not. You’ll know when you are seeing string algae if it’s stringy, clearly, and if you are capable of just pulling it out of your pond. It tends to stick to bottom of ponds and grow upwards in long strands. They get caught up in your pump and other mechanical systems very easily, and the best and easiest way to clean it is to take the pump out and physically clear away the algae. You can use a brush to scrub any growth on the outside of the casing, but if any sting algae has gotten inside, you will need to take out the pump from the pond altogether.

 Get In There And Clean Your Backyard Pond

Use a hose with a spray attachment and forcefully spray away the algae growth on the sides of the Koi pond. Be sure to spray the waterfall and the rocks that line the outside of the pond.

Then, use the net to scoop out the muck and sludge that’s been sitting at the bottom of the pond. This is going to be the messy part. You’re likely to come across a lot of smelly slime, partially decayed plant material and maybe even an incidental lizard or fish.

Once you are done cleaning the pond, it’s time to put the pond back together. Connect the pond pump back up, and replace all of your pond plants and accessories.

Fill The Pond Back Up

Use the garden hose to refill the pond to the desired water level you like. Once the pond is full, turn on the pump and let the water to circulate for a couple of minutes. Most likely you’re going to use tap water. Tap water has chlorine in it, so you may have to add a dechlorinator to safeguard the fish.

Add Your Fish

The new, fresh water in your pond is more likely colder than the water in the holding tank, so give your fish a little time to acclimate. To protect your fish you will want to dump some of the water out of the holding tank and replace it with the new pond water, and repeat the process a number of times.

Phoenix, Arizona Koi Pond

If you already have a Koi pond or if you are thinking about installing a pond and would like a little help or advice with budgeting and design considerations, talk to the Phoenix Koi Pond Experts in Peoria, AZ at The Backyard Pond. Call us today at 623-878-6695 and see what we can do for you.

What Is Koi

What Is Koi Phoenix AZ

Are you a koi fish enthusiast, fan or keeper? It won’t matter if you’re just starting with koi or a seasoned breeder, they always have something else to learn. Below are some interesting facts about koi, such as female koi’s are not only rounder, but larger than male koi fish.

Heritage of Koi

It is thought that the koi fish originated within China, later being used by Japanese as a food source, which started to breed koi during the 1800s for aesthetic appeal. Koi in their many beautiful varieties that we see today, are descendents of a black fish known as Magoi, better known as the common carp. They date back almost twenty five hundred years originating from Eastern Asia – in the Azov, Caspian, Aral and Black Seas – and from parts of China. Contrary to common belief Koi did not originate in Japan. Koi were brought to Japan with the invading Chinese approximately 200 BC.

Popularity Contest

The most popular koi fish in Japan is the Kohaku, which is a white and red koi, also known best as the koi you start with and the koi you end with. It is also the most popular in the U. S., as well as the Showa Sanke, and Taisho Sanke. Ogan Koi is more prominent even in inadequately filtered ponds because of their single color can be seen even in cloudy water.

Smarty Fish

When it comes to intelligence, the koi are rather smart. Similar to cats and dogs, a koi fish can be trained to eat from your hand, or some train koi to eat from their mouths. As koi are omnivores, they are known for eating pond plants. Some species of koi are also known to recognize their owners’ faces.

Body Works

A Koi fish is able to grow to great lengths, up to 3 feet in ideal living conditions, such as a pond. However, if a pond is not deep enough, they can get sunburnt, and they need plenty of shade. Females are bigger than males, and koi do not have teeth. Ogon Koi is also the most favored by breeders because it is known to have a longer lifespan than multicolored Koi.

The Great Mate

In the process of mating, it is common for koi to eat their recently hatched young, known as koi fry. It is important to separate the koi fish from the koi fry during mating season to ensure the fry is preserved. If breeders are raising koi that are highly sought, it can bring thousands of dollars per koi. For a prized koi, $250,000 is not unheard of. Koi, like many other types of fish, koi breed by spawning.

The Great, Great, Great Grandpa Koi

Most popular in Japan, the Kohaku is a variety of white koi with red patches.

The oldest known koi recorded was a legendary koi by the name of Hanako, which was hatched in 1751 and passed away in 1977, making it 226 years old. That means this koi survived through Industrial America, French Revolution, the United States formation, inventions of the automobile and electricity industries, World War I, World War II, and well into the Vietnam War. However, the average lifespan of koi is 30 to 40 years.

Showing Age

Although Hanako survived 226 years, the age of the koi could not be detected by the naked eye. The scales of a koi fish are covered by microscopic growth marks, similar to the rings on a tree. These marks indicate patterns of food shortage or rapid growth. Environmental factors also have a hand in how long your koi will live. In established koi ponds the quality of care is also a factor. The breed type may also determine lifespan.

Representations

Various virtues are symbolized by koi fish within Asian cultures. Koi are recognized as being symbols of endurance, perseverance, individualism and strength. In many cultures, tattoos representing koi are not uncommon, representing the overcoming of adversity. Koi are also associated with wealth and success. In Japan festivals are held for their positive qualities with family strength and development.

Rainbow of Ideals

As koi are able to develop a wide range of colors, there are no surprises that every hue developed connotation. Metallic koi symbolize business success. Gold koi represent prosperity and wealth. Blue koi represents serenity, while Asagi koi of red, blue and grey color represent positivity. Black koi are considered to have patriarchal symbolism, with blue belonging to the son, red to the mother, and pink to the daughter.

Do you know any interesting facts about koi fish you would like to share? Leave a comment or send us message using the contact form!